Type 2 ELS Codes: Divine Commentary

In a recent post, I introduced the phenomenon of biblical ELS codes. In that article I explained what biblical ELS codes are, and demonstrated their existence by way of many clear and irrefutable examples. Those of you who read that article will recall that I limited the focus of that investigation to only one of the three major categories of ELS codes mentioned therein, namely—Type 1 ELS codes. In this discussion we will pick up where the previous investigation left off, while shifting our attention to Type 2 ELS codes.

What are Type 2 ELS codes?

Type 2 ELS codes are what I refer to as Commentarial ELS codes, so called because this particular category of ELS code constitutes what I perceive to be something like a form of divine commentary on the biblical text. Whereas the primary function of Type 1 (Testimonial) ELS codes is to reveal and bear witness of Jesus, Type 2 codes are essentially Jesus (the encoder) “commenting” on what is going on in the containing passage. This makes Type 2 codes particularly fascinating, as you are essentially getting a glimpse of God’s thoughts on your favorite Old Testament stories.

Examples of Type 2 ELS codes

Like Type 1 ELS codes, Type 2 ELS codes can be oriented in a variety of different ways. The most common Type 2 ELS orientations are: declarative, prophetic, and supplementary. I have done my best to choose examples of Type 2 ELS codes which showcase all three of these orientations.

Example 1

The following Type 2 ELS code was discovered at 5:21a.m. on August 8, 2021:

Screenshot of a two-column table documenting a Type 2 ELS code in Judges 15:14-15. In the right-hand column the Hebrew text is shown with the letters comprising the ELS code highlighted in green. In the left-handed column the English translation of the passage is supplied, with the portion of text that is particularly relevant to the ELS code highlighted in yellow.
The Hebrew construct chain אש רוחי (“the fire of my Spirit”) is encoded at an ELS of every 9 letters in Judges 15:14-15.

As can be seen, the Hebrew construct chain אש רוחי (“The fire of my Spirit”) is encoded in Judges 15:14-15 at an ELS of every 9 letters. The topical relation between the encoded text-string and the containing biblical passage is blatantly obvious here. The fact that the encoded text-string refers to the spirit upon Samson as “my Spirit” is extremely significant, as it identifies the encoder/speaker as God himself. The inference is that the consuming fire of God’s spirit is what made it impossible to bind Samson.

Because the encoded text-string in this example merely comments on something going on in the containing passage, this particular Type 2 ELS code is declarative in its orientation.

Example 2

The following Type 2 ELS code was discovered at 4:50 a.m. on March 13, 2021:

Screenshot of a two-column table documenting a Type 2 ELS code in Isaiah 45:14-20. In the right-hand column the Hebrew text is shown with the letters comprising the ELS code highlighted in green. In the left-handed column the English translation of the passage is supplied, with the portion of text that is particularly relevant to the ELS code highlighted in yellow.
The Hebrew statement אין בעל (“There is no Baal”) is encoded at an ELS of every 66 letters backwards in Isaiah 45:14-20.

As shown in the figure above, the statement אין בעל (“There is no Baal”) is encoded at an ELS of every 66 letters in Isaiah 45:14-20. Baal was one of the chief Canaanite deities who was worshiped by the ancient Israelites during several recurring epochs of national apostasy. According to the book of 1 Kings, Baal worship was formerly introduced into Northern Israel by King Ahab in the ninth century BCE. Ahab is presented by the writer of 1 Kings as a king of weak moral character who was heavily influenced by his wife Jezebel—a Phoenician (Canaanite) princess. Baal worship would gradually spread from the Northern Kingdom of Israel to the southern kingdom of Judah according to the books of Kings and Chronicles, and the biblical writers present this continual national apostasy as what ultimately led to the fall of Northern Israel to the Assyrians in 722 BCE, and the fall of Judah to Babylon in 586 BCE. The entire Old Testament narrative presents Baal worship as the rival religion which enticed the ancient Israelites and caused their societies to fall away from the exclusive worship of the God of Israel.

Given the fact that this statement just so happens to be encoded in seven verses in which the prophet repeatedly condemns (in explicit detail) the making and worshiping of idols, is obviously remarkable–given that it too echoes the central theme of the chapter.

Because the encoded text-string in this case is a declarative statement, this Type 2 ELS code is also declarative in its orientation.

Example 3

Some Type 2 ELS codes can supplement the narrative of the containing passage by supplying supplemental information:

Screenshot of a two-column table documenting a Type 2 ELS code in Judges 13:17-18. In the right-hand column the Hebrew text is shown with the letters comprising the ELS code highlighted in green. In the left-handed column the English translation of the passage is supplied, with the portion of text that is particularly relevant to the ELS code highlighted in yellow.
The Hebrew name מיכאל (“Michael”) is encoded at an ELS of every 15 letters in Judges 13:17-18.

The above encoded text-string of Judges 13:17-18 appears to suggest that the angel who appeared to Samson’s parents to announce his birth and prophesy his life’s destiny was the archangel Michael. Michael is one of only two angels who are named in the Bible. Because the encoded text-string provides supplementary information which sheds light on the containing passage, this particular Type 2 ELS code is supplementary in its orientation.

Example 4

The following Type 2 ELS code was discovered at 5:19 a.m. on May 23, 2021:

Screenshot of a two-column table documenting a Type 2 ELS code in 2 Kings 5:4-10. In the right-hand column the Hebrew text is shown with the letters comprising the ELS code highlighted in green. In the left-handed column the English translation of the passage is supplied, with the portion of text that is particularly relevant to the ELS code highlighted in yellow.
The Hebrew word טבילה (“baptism”) is encoded at an ELS of every 117 letters backwards in 2 Kings 5:4-10

At first glance this particular encoded text-string may not seem all that statistically significant–given that it is only five letters long and is spread out over a fairly lengthy passage. This might be the case if not for the fact that the encoded string contains a tet, which is one of the least frequently occurring letters in the Hebrew Bible. This causes an enormous drop in the likelihood that this word is encoded here merely by chance.1

The purpose of this Type 2 ELS code is to establish a spiritual connection between the cleansing of Naaman’s leprosy and the New Testament practice of water Baptism. By encoding the word “baptism” in this passage, the encoder (God) wants us to understand that Naaman’s leprosy is a figurative type of human sins–which are remitted by the purifying waters of baptism (Acts 2:38; cf. Micah 7:19).

Example 5

The following Type 2 ELS code was discovered at about 4p.m. on March 22, 2021:

Screenshot of a two-column table documenting a Type 2 ELS code in Micah 4:1-4. In the right-hand column the Hebrew text is shown with the letters comprising the ELS code highlighted in green. In the left-handed column the English translation of the passage is supplied, with the portion of text that is particularly relevant to the ELS code highlighted in yellow.
The Hebrew statement הם ילמדו (“They will learn”) is encoded at an ELS of every 50 letters in Micah 4:1-4.

In this example, the encoded text-string is very obviously framed as a response to the line “he will teach us of his ways” in the plain text of the containing passage. Note that in the plain text of the containing passage the speaker is the people of Israel, who are stating that God will teach them of his ways; whereas in the encoded text-string—the exact reverse is true. Here it is God who is the speaker, and he is stating that the children of Israel will learn. The fact that speaker of the encoded text-string here yet again identifies himself as the of God Israel attests once more that the mysterious encoder of the Hebrew Scriptures is none other than God himself.

Because the statement of the encoded message is an imperfect tense statement which speaks of something to be fulfilled in the future, this particular Type 2 ELS code is prophetic in its orientation.

Example 6

The following Type 2 ELS code was discovered at 6:13a.m. on June 21, 2021:

Screenshot of a two-column table documenting a Type 2 ELS code in Psalm 95:11-96:4. In the right-hand column the Hebrew text is shown with the letters comprising the ELS code highlighted in green. In the left-handed column the English translation of the passage is supplied, with the portion of text that is particularly relevant to the ELS code highlighted in yellow.
The Hebrew statement ישירו לי (“They will sing to m”) is encoded at an ELS of every 20 letters in Psalm 95:11-96:4.

In this example the encoded statement very obviously corresponds to the highlighted lyrics of Psalm 96. The direct object “me” in the encoded statement yet again identifies speaker/encoder as God himself. Because the encoded message speaks of something to be fulfilled in the future–this particular Type 2 ELS code is prophetic in its orientation.

Example 7

The following Type 2 ELS code was discovered on an unknown date several months ago:

Screenshot of a two-column table documenting a Type 2 ELS code in 1 Chronicles 17:21-27. In the right-hand column the Hebrew text is shown with the letters comprising the ELS code highlighted in green. In the left-handed column the English translation of the passage is supplied, with the portion of text that is particularly relevant to the ELS code highlighted in yellow.
The Hebrew phrase עדר כל הגוים (“herd of all the nations”) is encoded at an ELS of every 36 letters in 1 Chronicles 17:21-27.

The topical relation between the encoded text-string and the containing passage in the above example is obvious and should need no explanation.

I might add that any encoded text-string consisting of more than 8 letters is considered to be exceptionally long, which has a minuscule probability of being encoded anywhere in the Bible by random chance–let alone in a passage with blatantly obvious topical relation to the encoded text-string! Not only that, but this particular encoded text-string also contains a gimmel (ג), which is one of the least frequently occurring letters in the Hebrew Bible. Taken together, the likelihood of this encoded text-string being encoded in a topically relevant passage just by random chance is literally nonexistent. To quote Pharaoh’s magician in the book of Exodus: “This is the finger of God.” (Exod. 8:19)

Conclusion

In this brief examination we have looked at several different examples of Type 2 ELS codes, also known as Commentarial ELS codes. Like Type 1 ELS codes, Type 2 ELS codes function as watermarks of divine authenticity, as a built-in system of spell checkers, and as an additional/supplemental layer of biblical revelation. The only thing that differentiates Type 2 ELS codes from Type 1 ELS codes is their content. Whereas Type 1 ELS codes are encoded statements which bear direct witness of Jesus Christ, Type 2 ELS codes are a form of divine commentary which sheds light on the meaning of the containing biblical passages, often by supplying supplemental information. Through Type 2 ELS codes, the divine encoder sheds light on the spiritual and prophetic meaning of the containing biblical passages.

Thus concludes our discussion on Type 2 ELS codes. In the final part of this series I will introduce Type 3 ELS codes.

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  1. As a general rule, text-strings comprised entirely of common or moderately common letters, which also exhibit obvious topical relation to their containing passage, can be presumed to be authentic if they are 7-8 letters in length. For text-strings containing at least 1 rare letter, a length of 5-6 letters is sufficient to presume authenticity.

By Zerubbabel

Zerubbabel is the pen-name of the founder of this ministry. He has an academic background in history, classical literature, and biblical studies; and possesses a peculiar gift for understanding and explaining the deeper mysteries of the Holy Bible.

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