Who encoded the Bible?

In previous articles, I demonstrated by way of many irrefutable examples that the Hebrew Scriptures are saturated with ELS codes which exhibit all the obvious markers of intelligent design. As we have seen, the authenticity of these Bible codes is proven by the fact that they occur in topically relevant biblical passages at statistically minuscule probabilities. That such codes exist is undeniable. In fact, so far as I am concerned, the question is no longer “Are Bible codes real?,” but rather—“Who encoded the Bible?” In this article we will answer this question by simply allowing the evidence to speak for itself.

Why the biblical writers and copyists could not have encoded the Bible

ELS Bible codes are found in all 39 books of the Old Testament in the original Hebrew. For anyone even remotely familiar with how the Old Testament came together, it should be fairly obvious that the biblical writers could not have been responsible for these codes. The books of the Old Testament were written by approximately 32 different men who were all living at different times over a period of about 1,000 years—all of whom were writing with their own unique set of conscious intentions. Whatever these intentions and private motivations were, it is certain that none of these men (with the possible exception of maybe Moses) had even the slightest clue that they were penning Scripture at the time they were writing. What is more, they most certainly would not have had the foresight to know that their writings would be preserved and continually recopied by hand centuries after their deaths, and would eventually be gathered together into one volume which would be mass disseminated throughout the entire earth thanks to the inventions of the codex and a revolutionary device called the printing press.

The fact that they all lived at different times over a 1,000 year period, and did not know that they were penning works that would later be received as part of a unified body of literature—in and of itself proves that the biblical writers could not have been consciously responsible for the Bible codes found encrypted in their texts. But even if this were not the case—the timelessness of the codes also proves that they could not have been responsible. The person(s) responsible for the Bible codes possesses a knowledge of people, things, concepts, and even language that did not exist at the time that the books of the Old Testament were penned. One of the most obvious and prevalent examples which demonstrates this truth are the numerous ELS codes about Jesus that we find encoded in topically relevant Old Testament passages, hundreds of years before his birth. Add to that the fact that many ELS Bible codes use modern Hebrew words to refer to modern concepts which did not even exist, or were yet unknown—at the time that the Old Testament books were written.1 Some of these codes even use words which modern Hebrew borrowed directly from modern English! Obviously, codes of this nature could not have been deliberately encrypted by imperfect mortal men subject to the laws of time and space.

The third and final reason that the biblical writers could not have been responsible for the Bible codes pertains to the degree of intelligence that such an elaborate system of codes necessitates. As I stated in my previous introductory article to ELS codes, any given biblical passage in the Old Testament has a seemingly infinite number of topically relevant ELS codes encrypted within it—all of which are encrypted in the text at completely different equidistant letter sequences. This means that the encoder is having to narrate a story (or speak a prophecy), while ordering his words in such a way that not just one, but multiple prophetically meaningful and contextually relevant messages appear within the text at completely different equidistant letter sequences. And he is having to do all of this while still faithfully abiding by all of the grammatical laws of the ancient Hebrew language. Such a feat requires a level of intelligence that can only be described as superhuman.

The Bible codes reveal who encoded the Bible

For all of the reasons just described, the Old Testament writers could not have encoded the Bible, and the very same attributes which disqualify them also allows us to rule out the Jewish scribes and copyists who preserved and transmitted the Old Testament into the Middle Ages.

Fortunately, the same attributes which disqualify the biblical writers and copyists also provide us with something of a profile of the candidate we’re looking for. Specifically, we know that the person who encoded the Bible is someone who is: a.) not bound by the laws of time and space, and b.) possesses a level of intelligence which can only be described as superhuman. This disqualifies all human beings save for one man, and it just so happens that the Bible codes themselves appear to affirm that this exact man is the person who is responsible for the codes. Let us now examine a few different examples which demonstrate what I mean.

Example 1

Those of you who have read my introduction to ELS codes article may remember this first example I shared previously from the book of Isaiah. Behold:

Screenshot of a two-column table documenting a Type 1 ELS Bible code in Genesis 22:7-9. In the right-hand column the Hebrew text is shown with the letters comprising the ELS code highlighted in green. In the left-handed column the English translation of the passage is supplied, with the line that is particularly relevant to the ELS code highlighted in yellow.
The statement אני ישוע (“I am Jesus”) is encoded in the original Hebrew text of Isaiah 46:3-4 at an ELS of every 12 letters backwards.

The authenticity of the encoded statement is attested by the obvious harmony between it and the containing passage. Note that God himself is the speaker in the plain text of these two verses. The fact that we find the statement “I am Jesus” encrypted in these two verses where God himself is speaking to the nation of Israel in the first person–is obviously remarkable. The encoded statement here is obviously intended to expound upon the highlighted statement “I am he” in the plain text. By encrypting this first-person statement in this specific Old Testament passage, Jesus is identifying himself both as God in the flesh, as well as the cryptographic mastermind who encoded the Bible.

Example 2

Our next example is another one that I have written about in a previous article. This one contains two encoded first-person statements, encoded separately at two different equidistant letter sequences. Behold:

Isaiah 53:8-54:1 in the original Hebrew text, with the two encoded statements of the Bible code of Isaiah 53 (encoded at twenty level interval skips) highlighted in blue and red.
The statements ישוע שמי (“Jesus is my name”) and נצלבתי (“I was crucified”) are both encoded in the original Hebrew text of Isaiah 53:8-54:1 (the first at an ELS of every 20 letters backwards, the second at an ELS of every 52 letters).

It should be noted right off the bat that Isaiah 53 is hands down probably the most blatantly obvious prophetic description of the sacrificial death of Jesus Christ in the entire Old Testament. Thus the fact that we find the statements “Jesus is my name” and “I was crucified” both encrypted in this chapter is obviously not a coincidence. As I stated in the previous article I wrote about this particular ELS code, by encrypting these first-person statements in this particular prophecy–Jesus is identifying himself as not only the person being described in the plain text, but also as the very spirit of prophecy speaking through Isaiah, as well as the mysterious cryptographic mastermind responsible for the Bible codes.

Example 3

Our next example is encoded in very close proximity to our last example in Isaiah 53. The encoded message is found at an ELS of every 92 letters backwards, beginning in Isaiah 53:7 and ending in 52:8. Behold:

Screenshot of a two-column table documenting the ELS Bible code in Isaiah 52:8-53:7 in which the individual who encoded the Bible reveals his identity. In the right-hand column the Hebrew text is shown with the letters of the encoded text-string highlighted bright green. In the left-handed column the English translation of the containing passage is supplied, with the portions that are topically relevant to the ELS code highlighted yellow. The encoded statement begins in Isaiah 53:7 and runs backwards at an ELS of every 92 letters--ending in 52:8. The full encoded message is אני הוא: ישו, which in English translates as: "I am he: Jesus."
The statement אני הוא: ישו (“I am he: Jesus”) is encoded at an ELS of every 92 letters backwards in the original Hebrew text of Isaiah 52:8-53:7.

Here we see that the statement “I am he: Jesus” is encoded in one of the most blatantly obvious prophetic descriptions of Jesus Christ in the entire Old Testament. It is worth mentioning that this is the only place in the entire Hebrew Old Testament where this encoded text-string is found encoded at a standard ELS depth. Combine with that the fact that this statement is encoded literally right next to the related encoded statements: “Jesus is my name” and “I was crucified,” and it becomes undeniable that this is not here by coincidence. This is the encoder once again identifying himself by name, and affirming that he is the subject of the prophecies in the containing passage.

Example 4

Our next example is found at an ELS of every 59 letters in 1 Kings 8:20-25. Behold:

Screenshot of a two-column table documenting the ELS Bible code in 1 Kings 8:20-25 in which the individual who encoded the Bible reveals his identity. In the right-hand column the Hebrew text is shown with the letters of the encoded text-string highlighted bright green. In the left-handed column the English translation of the containing passage is supplied, with the portions that are topically relevant to the ELS code highlighted yellow. The encoded statement is encrypted at an ELS of every 59 letters, beginning in 1 Kings 8:20 and ending in 8:25. The full encoded message is: שמי ישוע, which translates to English as: "My name is Jesus."
The statement שמי ישוע (“My name is Jesus”) is encoded at an ELS of every 59 letters in the original Hebrew text of 1 Kings 8:20-25.

As can be seen, the statement “My name is Jesus” is encrypted in 1 Kings 8:20-25 at an ELS of every 59 letters. The code’s authenticity is attested by the obvious topical relation between the encoded text-string and the containing passage. In the containing passage, Solomon is publicly addressing the nation and leading it in prayer. The encoded statement (“My name is Jesus”) is obviously intended to build upon the phrase “the name of the LORD God of Israel” in the plain text of the containing passage. Here yet again the encoder reveals his personal identity by stating his name in the first-person.

Example 5

In some codes, the encoder hints at his identity in more subtle ways, as in the following example:

Screenshot of a two-column table documenting the ELS Bible code in Isaiah 22:18-24 in which the individual who encoded the Bible hints at his identity by stating something about himself in the first-person. In the right-hand column the Hebrew text is shown with the letters of the encoded text-string highlighted bright green. In the left-handed column the English translation of the containing passage is supplied, with the portions that are topically relevant to the ELS code highlighted yellow. The encoded statement is encrypted at an ELS of every 56 letters, beginning in Isaiah 22:18 and ending in 22:24. The full encoded message is: נדקרתי, which translates to English as: "I was pierced."
The statement נדקרתי (“I was pierced”) is encoded at an ELS of every 56 letters in the original Hebrew text of Isaiah 22:18-24.

Here yet again the authenticity of the encoded text-string is attested by the obvious topical relation between it and the highlighted portion of the containing passage. When analyzed alongside this highlighted statement in the plain text, it becomes painfully obvious (pun intended) that the encoder is Jesus, and that his encoded statement “I was pierced” is him referring to his crucifixion (Ps. 22:16; Zech. 12:10; 13:6; John 19:37; Rev. 1:7).

Example 6

The following ELS code from Genesis 3 is another example of a Type 1 ELS in which the encoder discloses his identity without actually stating his name. Behold:

Screenshot of a two-column table documenting the ELS Bible code in Genesis 3:6-12 in which the individual who encoded the Bible hints at his identity by encoding a comment about the tree that is being spoken of in the plain text of the containing passage. In the right-hand column the Hebrew text is shown with the letters of the encoded text-string highlighted bright green. In the left-hand column the English translation of the containing passage is supplied, with the portions that are topically relevant to the ELS code highlighted yellow. The encoded statement is encrypted at an ELS of every 58 letters, beginning in Genesis 3:6 and ending in 3:12. The full encoded message is: עץ מותי, which translates to English as: "The tree of my death."
The statement עץ מותי (“the tree of my death”) is encoded at an ELS of every 58 letters backwards in the original Hebrew text of Genesis 3:6-12.

As can be seen, the phrase “the tree of my death” is encoded in this passage which describes Adam and Eve yielding to Satan’s deception and eating from the tree of the knowledge of good and evil—an action which resulted in the fall of the Creation. God’s plan of salvation for humanity was immediately set into motion the very second that this act of willful disobedience occurred. Because Adam subjugated all of his authority to Satan through his willful disobedience, humanity was now spiritually cut off from God, and human nature was now irreversibly corrupted. In order to fix this, God himself would now have to become a man, live a morally perfect life and perfectly fulfill the righteousness of the Law (which Adam was supposed to do but failed), and die as man’s substitute.2 It is for this reason that the encoder (Jesus) refers to the tree of the knowledge of good and evil as “the tree of my death,” as man’s eating from this tree led directly to his crucifixion. As soon as Adam ate from this forbidden tree, Jesus’ crucifixion was officially certified and destined to happen.

Example 7

Another interesting example of an ELS code which reveals who encoded the Bible is found in Deuteronomy 18. Behold:

Screenshot of a two-column table documenting the ELS Bible code in Deuteronomy 18:5-19 in which the individual who encoded the Bible hints at his identity by encoding a comment about the future prophet that he will raise up, who is being spoken of in the plain text of the containing passage in verses 15-19. In the right-hand column the Hebrew text is shown with the letters of the encoded text-string highlighted bright green. In the left-hand column the English translation of the containing passage is supplied, with the portions that are topically relevant to the ELS code highlighted yellow. The encoded statement is encrypted at an ELS of every 115 letters, beginning in Deuteronomy 18:5 and ending in 18:19. The full encoded message is: שוב אקום, which translates to English as: "I will rise again."
The statement שוב אקום (“I will rise again”) is encoded in the original Hebrew text of Deuteronomy 18:5-19 at an ELS of every 115 letters.

The topical relation between the encoded text-string and the containing passage should be fairly self-evident in this example. The highlighted verses in the figure above have long been esteemed by the Church as one of the most obvious prophecies about Jesus in the Pentateuch. The verb “raise up” in this prophecy has a dual meaning. On the one hand, the phrase “raise up” is a common figurative way of denoting the act of establishing. Thus in this example, God is simply stating that he will one day establish a certain prophet among the people who will instruct them. On a prophetic level, however, the meaning is literal—God is literally going to “raise up” (resurrect) this future prophet. This latter prophetic meaning was a mystery that wouldn’t have made sense to anyone until Jesus rose from the dead and fulfilled it. The authenticity of the encoded text-string is affirmed by this latter literal-prophetic meaning of the prophecy in the containing passage, as this very same statement (“I will rise again”) is something that Jesus literally says in the New Testament (Matt. 27:63).

It is obvious who encoded the Bible.

We need not endlessly speculate about who encoded the Bible, as the answer to this question is provided by the encoder himself. In this article we have looked at several different Type 1 ELS codes in which the mysterious cryptographer responsible for the Bible codes makes his personal identity known. As we have seen, in many of the codes the encoder literally introduces himself by name in the first person; while in others he attests of his identity more subtly through the use of hints and pseudo-identifiers. In both cases, the authenticity of these codes is attested by the occurrence of obvious topical relation between the encoded text-string and the containing biblical passage.

There can be absolutely no doubt that Jesus Christ, that is—God in the flesh (1 Tim. 3:16; John 1:14; cf. John 1:1), is the cryptographic mastermind behind the Bible codes. Reinforcing this conclusion is the fact that God alone possesses the superhuman intelligence, knowledge, and abilities that would be required to devise such an elaborate system of codes which defy both human logic as well as the laws of time (Job 36:4; 37:16; Ps. 147:5; Isa. 40:8; 2 Tim. 2:9; Isa. 42:9; John 13:19; 14:29). No group of mortal human beings could have conspired together to place these codes in the Bible. Indeed, as the divine encoder himself rightly stated during his earthly ministry: “With men this is impossible; but with God all things are possible.” (Matt. 19:26; cf. Mark 10:27; Luke 18:27).

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  1. For a more detailed discussion on this topic, see my recent article on modern Hebrew Bible codes.
  2. This is why Jesus is referred to in the New Testament as “the second Adam.” He had to become a man to do everything that Adam had failed to do.

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